Hey J.Crew, como que estás muy “Oaxaca inspired”

It’s Friday, it’s full on Spring weather in LA, and my freshly minted copy of the J.Crew Style Guide arrived in the mail today. Aaaah! Time for some fantasy shopping and virtual wish lists. It’s like I want the entire catalog every month. 

Something caught my eye, however, about these Spring trends and colorful items featured in the catalog this month. Como que J.Crew se fue south of the border for some inspiration, y se fusilaron todas las modas, textiles y los patterns de las oaxaqueñas y las guatemaltecas. Hmmm, these look really familiar. 

Claro que están padrísimas y super cute. But if the median price range from their collection is $110-395 dollars, it makes me think we should probably all book a trip down there soon and  bring back some of these goods, whilst we support the (our) people and artists who created the original styles. We should consider doing that instead.  Se me hace que esto es mas “fair practice” and doing the better thing.

Don’t get me wrong, it’s fun to see these Latino trends in mainstream fashion. There’s blouses, linen tunics, a “Mercado” poncho (for $395 bucks thank you very much) and chanclitas and huaraches galore to get us all excited. It’s not like we didn’t know all these things were fashionable, but it takes a powerhouse company like J.Crew to bring it to the general market in America and you can bet your bottom dollar they’re gonna use it for all it’s worth, sin pagar derechos de autor. 

I guess that’s why they call it capitalism, right? (Lo malo es que lo copian en China y se roban toda la creatividad de los nuestros… sigh.)

This brings up a conflict of interest for me. Pero no me hagan mucho caso. I love J.Crew and can’t really speak ill of them, except to say que me gustaria que le bajaran a los precios mas seguido.

By the way, Jenna Lyons is on the cover of Fast Company this month and there’s a great story of how the company works with a behind the scenes look at her office. 

Here’s a sneak peak at what they’re featuring this month.

The "Embroidered Gauze Top" retails for $110 dollars. Must be nice! (Photo from jcrew.com)

The “Embroidered Gauze Top” inspired by a vintage Mexican folk dress retails for $110 dollars. Must be nice! (Photo from jcrew.com)

I can't get over the "MERCADO" poncho. This baby sets you back $350 bucks. ¡No manchen! (screenshot from jcrew.com)

I can’t get over the “MERCADO” poncho. This baby sets you back $395 bucks. ¡No manchen! (screenshot from jcrew.com)

Here's another look at the Mercado Popover from jcrew.com ($395 bucks I tell you!)

Here’s another look at the Mercado Popover from jcrew.com ($395 bucks I tell you!)

A short sleeve sweater with patterns and embroidery reminiscent of the Mayas. "Collection short sleeve beaded sweater" retails for $188 at jcrew.com.

A short sleeve sweater with patterns and embroidery reminiscent of the Mayas. “Collection short sleeve beaded sweater” retails for $188 at jcrew.com.

Jenna Lyons on the cover of Fast Company this month (a good read!) and the May 2013 Style Guide from J. Crew. (photo from iPad)

Jenna Lyons on the cover of Fast Company this month (a good read!) and the May 2013 Style Guide from J. Crew. (photo from iPad)

For the photogallery Inside Jenna Lyons office, click here.

Vanity Fair España, lo máximo

If you’re looking for a smart pop culture magazine for these times, may I recommend Vanity Fair en Español, published en España by Conde Nast and sold here in the US at Barnes and Noble.

Ever since I found out it existed en español, I’ve been kind of obsessed with it. And I came late to the game, because it has been published since 2008 but just started reading it recently.  I’ve read the English version since 1989 (era una bebita leyéndola, hehe) but now I’ve transferred my affections to the Spanish version. No offense, Mr. Graydon Carter.

Yes, it may be trivial, a little fanciful, and out of my reality, but it is so addictive to read about interesting people in the arts, entertainment and cultural/political realms. Some of the articles are translated from the English sister mag, but mostly they do their own features and photoshoots.

Recent covers have had the Carolina Herreras (mother and daughter), Antonio and Melanie, la Reina Noor, y la Duquesa Cayetana de Alba que se acaba de volver a casar a los 85 años, so there’s definitely an aire de chisme to it as well. However, this is not your typical chisme from the  revistas en español that you find all over the place, like the overly public relations infused People en Español and the naquisima for the nac0-masses TV Notas. Nooooo, este es el chisme for the rest of us. (Yes, I’m a snob!)

You can find Vanity Fair at some of the Barnes and Nobles around town (it will set you back $10 bucks so you just may want to read it at the store) or in my case I’ve been lucky because my sisters and Mom buy it for me across the border where it costs 65 pesos.

Or you may want to browse their fabulous online version at http://www.revistavanityfair.es/ and read it for free. But you should try to support good magazines if you can and buy one every so often.

Here’s a great article on Mario Vargas Llosa, one of the most fabulous and gifted writers there is, and a recent Nobel laureate. He was voted as the “Personaje del Año” by Vanity Fair just this month:

“Mario Vargas Llosa, el hombre que nunca se rinde”  (Click for the link.)

¡Felices Lecturas!

Four recent Vanity Fair en Español covers from 2011.

¡Esa mi Cayetana! La Duquesa de Alba on the cover, when she confirmed she was getting married again at the age of 85. Why not?

The editorial work is lovely and the photos are cool. Here's a recent photo with Ewan McGregor.

Ahi va mi colección de este año. Las cuido como oro molido!

Que buena foto!! Foto de Mario Vargas Llosa tomada del artículo online de http://www.revistavanityfair.es